LIVING ORGAN DONATION

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LIVING ORGAN DONATION

Organ donation can take place with living donors. A living donor gives the gift of life when agreeing to donate an organ to save someone else.

Organs that can be transplanted while the donor is alive include the kidney and liver. Although most living donations happen amongst family members, there have been living organ donation from strangers.

In June 2016, Mr Lim Kok Seng, 54, became the first living donor in Singapore to donate part of his liver to a complete stranger, 16-year-old Lim Si Jia. The surgery went smoothly and both the donor and recipient recovered well.1

In living organ donation, organ transplant doctors are able to perform stringent medical tests to assess the suitability and viability of both the donor and the recipient before performing the organ transplant, thereby increasing the chance of a successful surgery. Living organ transplant also increases the pool of organs for recipients as deceased donor rates remain low.

Is Organ Transplant Risky?

Since living donors have to undergo surgery for organ donation, there are certain risks involved. The risks differ among donors and also according to the organ donated. You should consult your doctor on your suitability to become a living donor.

Organ Transplantation Regulations

Prior authorisation from the hospital’s Transplant Ethics Committee (TEC) is required before a living donor organ transplant can proceed. To become a living organ donor, you must understand the nature and consequence of the medical procedures and give your full consent.

Organ trading is prohibited in Singapore. There should not be any monetary incentives or forced compliance to donate an organ. This applies to all living donor organ transplants, regardless of whether the donor and recipient are related or not.

Financial Considerations

HOTA allows for reimbursement of the costs or expenses, or loss of earnings that may be reasonably incurred as a result of organ donation for altruistic living donors. This will include costs for health checks, laboratory tests, donation operations, follow-up visits and limited indirect costs such as loss of earnings by self-employed or daily-wage workers.

It is important for you to fully understand the medical and financial implications of donation. Once this is done, you may choose to seek reimbursement for expenses incurred in relation to donation. However, you can also choose not to receive reimbursement or payment from the recipient.

The decision to donate

The decision to be a living donor is a personal choice. It is a life-saving and altruistic act to donate your organ to someone else. If you wish to be a living donor, you must consider the risks involved, as well as the potential to save the life of the recipient, who may be a loved one.




Reference:

  1. 1. 24 Jun 2016, TODAY Online, “Singapore needs more organ donors”

Organ donation can take place with living donors. A living donor gives the gift of life when agreeing to donate an organ to save someone else.

Some organs and tissues that can be transplanted while the donor is alive include the kidney, liver, or tissue. Although most living donations happen amongst family members, there have been living organ donation between strangers.

In June 2016, Mr Lim Kok Seng, 54, became the first living donor in Singapore to donate part of his liver to a complete stranger, 16-year-old Lim Si Jia. The surgery went smoothly and both the donor and recipient recovered well.1

In living organ donation, organ transplant doctors are able to perform stringent medical tests to assess the suitability and viability of both the donor and the recipient before performing the organ transplant, thereby increasing the chance of a successful surgery. Living organ transplant also allows for more preparation time to ensure the best optimal time for transplant to take place. Living organ transplant also increases the pool of organs for recipients as deceased donor rates remain low.

Since living donors have to undergo surgery for organ donation, there are certain risks involved. The risks differ among donors and also according to the organ donated. You should consult your doctor on your suitability to become a living donor.

Prior authorisation from the hospital’s Transplant Ethics Committee (TEC) is required before a living donor organ transplant can proceed. To become a living organ donor, you must understand the nature and consequence of the medical procedures and give your full consent.

It is illegal to trade in human organs or blood in Singapore. There should not be any monetary incentives or forced compliance to donate an organ. This applies to all living donor organ transplants, regardless of whether the donor and recipient are related or not.

HOTA allows for reimbursement of the costs or expenses, or loss of earnings that may be reasonably incurred as a result of organ donation for altruistic living donors. This will include costs for health checks, laboratory tests, donation operations, follow-up visits and limited indirect costs such as loss of earnings by self-employed or daily-wage workers.

It is important for you to fully understand the medical and financial implications of donation. Once this is done, you may choose to seek reimbursement for expenses incurred in relation to donation. However, you can also choose not to receive reimbursement or payment from the recipient.

The decision to be a living donor is a personal choice. It is a life-saving and altruistic act to donate your organ to someone else. If you would like to register as a living donor, you must consider the risks involved, as well as the potential to save the life of the recipient, who may be a loved one.

It is important for you to fully understand the medical and financial implications of donation. Once this is done, you may choose to seek reimbursement for expenses incurred in relation to donation. However, you can also choose not to receive reimbursement or payment from the recipient.